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Preconstruction Investing Information

Original post by Leslie McClintock of Demand Media

Real estate investors seek to maximize their return on capital. Meanwhile, real estate developers must raise capital at all stages of the property development process. One of the ways they do this is by offering favorable pricing to those willing to invest in a property before construction begins. The developer gets the benefit of some cash with which to begin the construction, as well as an easier time attracting bank financing.

Prospectus

When a developer begins to seek investment capital for a planned real estate development, he will write a prospectus. This is a document that explains the construction plans, the capital requirements and expected outlays, and lays out the anticipated risks. Corporations that have been in business for longer than a year will generally also have an annual report on record, which will contain valuable information about the business.

Advantages of Preconstruction Investing

In theory, you can buy into property development projects at a steep discount by purchasing during the preconstruction phase. Because you will eventually sell, or generate income at the same level as those who got in later, the preconstruction investor's return on investment, or ROI, is greater. However, construction does not always go as planned. There is no guarantee that a preconstruction investment won't fall in value while you are waiting.

Disadvantages of Preconstruction Investing

Preconstruction projects can be riskier: If the developer runs out of cash and can't raise money to finance the completion of construction, investors can get left holding the bag for some time. You also tie up capital for the construction period without the opportunity to live in the property or rent it out to generate income.

Where to Get More Information

Generally, the best information on preconstruction investment opportunities will come from the companies themselves, from agents representing real estate investment opportunities in the area, and from your own due diligence, looking at the values of similar properties nearby.

                   

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About the Author

Leslie McClintock has been writing professionally since 2001. She has been published in "Wealth and Retirement Planner," "Senior Market Advisor," "The Annuity Selling Guide," and many other outlets. A licensed life and health insurance agent, McClintock holds a B.A. from the University of Southern California.

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