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Does IRA Withdrawal Affect Disability Benefit?

Original post by Amanda Layman Low of Demand Media

Any Social Security benefits you receive before full retirement age can decrease when your income goes up. However, the Social Security Administration (SSA) doesn’t count money in your IRA as part of your income. Instead, income includes only wages from work or self-employment. As long as you meet the other criteria for receiving disability benefits, you won’t see a change in your benefit amount -- even if you’re withdrawing from your IRA regularly.

SSDI

If you’re collecting Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI), your IRA withdrawals won’t have any impact on your SSDI payments. Your eligibility for SSDI relies on the severity of your medical condition (it must be expected to last at least a year or result in death) and whether you have worked long enough while paying Social Security taxes. However, if you are able to work while disabled and you are earning more than $1,000 a month, your benefit will be reduced or eliminated.

SSI

Supplemental Security Income (SSI), Social Security’s other program for the disabled, works a little differently than SSDI. Because your eligibility for SSI is based on both income and resources, an IRA withdrawal may count as a resource and may subsequently reduce your SSI benefit. To be eligible for SSI, you must meet Social Security’s definition of disabled, your income may be no more than $1,433 a month, and you may have no more than $2,000 worth of resources.

Reporting Your Earnings

Whenever there is a change in your financial situation, you must report this change to the SSA. This rule includes any changes in your spouse’s or other family members’ income and resources, as well. You may call 800-772-1213 to report the change, or visit your local Social Security office to do it in person. If you don’t report a change, you may have to pay back any benefits you collected after the change went into effect.

What Affects Your Benefits

The SSA doesn’t just count your wages as income. It also counts gift money, unemployment benefits, annuities, pensions, settlements, inheritances and rental pay as part of your income when determining your eligibility for disability. Also, it takes into account your resources, which includes cash, bank accounts and U.S. stocks and bonds. Even if you don’t think it will affect your benefits, you must still report all financial changes to the Social Security Administration.

                   

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About the Author

Amanda Layman Low began writing professionally in 2005. Her fiction and artwork has appeared in the Drury publication "Currents" and she was the 2006 fiction recipient of the Chapin-Tague Juanita Jones Award. She has written internet articles specializing in finance, business, health, beauty and fashion. Low has a Bachelor of Arts in writing from Drury University and has worked as a freelance artist since 2008.

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